Thursday, July 23, 2009

Johnny Cash


7-23-09 Johnny Cash


LPx2 AT FOLSOM PRISON AND SAN QUENTIN re-issue COLUMBIA US CG 33639

1967/9 25 TRKS Live, re-issue

CD AT FOLSOM PRISON re COLUMBIA US CK 65955

1968 19 TRKS ('99 issue) (3 x bonus tracks)

LP BEST OF CBS NZ CBCSP 026

1976 19 TRK Collection

LP BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS COLUMBIA US CS 8730

1962 9 TRKS stereo

CD CARRYIN' ON WITH (June Carter) re COLUMBIA US CK 86088

1967 13 TRKS ('02 issue) (2 x bonus tracks)

CD DEFINITIVE COLLECTION, THE MERCURY US B0010667.2

2008 19 TRK Collection ('85-'93 recordings)

LP EVERYBODY LOVES A NUT COLUMBIA US CS 9292

1965? 11 TRKS stereo, Jack Davis cover art

LP FABULOUS JOHNNY CASH, THE mono COLUMBIA US CL 1253

1958? 12 TRKS mono

LP HOLY LAND, THE COLUMBIA US KCS 9726

1968? 21 TRKS 3-D cover, stereo

CDx2 JOHNNY CASH AT SAN QUENTIN (Legacy Edition) COLUMBIA US 75914.2

2006 31 TRKS + DVD; Live, 2/24/69

LP NOW HERE'S JOHNNY CASH SUN US DT-90678

1959? 12 TRKS re-processed stereo


I recently obtained the “Johnny Cash At San Quentin” CD boxed set that comes with a DVD documentary. It’s pretty neat – almost the whole show on 2 CD’s, and a British TV documentary, with ‘actualities’.


Of course, I remember Johnny Cash being on TV in the late 60’s. I was always slightly conflicted about Bob Dylan appearing with Mr. Cash on TV, but…less so these days. I even like Dylan’s “Nashville Skyline” now!


I was taken to see Johnny Cash on my birthday, in the early 90’s – it was at a small-ish nightclub (that no longer exists). June Carter referred to Johnny as “Old Golden Throat”. I also saw John Entwistle perform a show at that club…


I owned a few Johnny Cash records – once upon a time – before I owned any other country & western records. Long gone, now (45’s). I have had friends who held Mr. Cash in inordinately high regard (especially during ‘punk days’).


I have heard the latter day recordings – like where Mr. Cash covered Depeche Mode

“Everybody Loves A Nut” is Johnny’s comedy / novelty LP – complete with Jack Davis cover art! Did you know he made a comedy / novelty LP?


It was very interesting to read the story about how that photo of Johnny flipping a bird to the British camera crew came about. Nice that it’s on T-shirts etc.


We all miss Johnny Cash.


6 comments:

Jim said...

That "bird shot" is the most vicious image I've ever seen. When I first saw that I just stared at it for a long, long time, not unlike the infamous mug shot of Paul Reubens. Both images haunted me.

When I look at pictures of Johnny Cash from the 70s, especially, I see my dad, half of the time.

We always intended to see Johnny Cash when he played his annual show at Silver Springs in Florida, but we waited too long.

At least I finally got off of my duff and saw Mel Torme on what was probably his last tour before his stroke.

Warren Bowman said...

So what *is* the story about how the picture came about? Where can I find it? Where can I go to get my poodle clipped?

Brian Ware said...

Back in the late 60s when the "generation gap" in our house was a mile wide, Johnny Cash and The Tijuana Brass were pretty much the only artists that my dad and I could agree on.

Ron Kane said...

The British film crew wouldn't get out of his way, on a rehearsal stage. Johnny flipped the bird, lucky photographer snapped it. Mott has a T-shirt of it.

Jim said...

Mr. Ware:

Since my parents were in their 40s when they adopted me, there was no generation gap in my home. I've observed that the generation gap is more acute when the generation between parents and offspring is a tight 20 years, as compared to the 40 years span with my folks. When you're 20 years younger then your dad, I think there is a subconscious competition between sire and offspring that manifests itself in a safe outlet for aggression, such as the generation gap.

That's my theory based on what I've observed in my life and that of my friends, anyway.

In my house I was perfectly fine with anything my parents listened to, except for Hee Haw, of course. My mom liked Blondie & The Cramps. But there was a lot of Hee Haw that I didn't mind. Roy Clark and Buck Owens were good, and guys like Doug Kershaw and Jerry Reed were ace to me. It was just the Porter Wagoner types that rankled. Of course we all watched Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash & The Smothers Brothers. All great performers.

Brian Ware said...

Interesting observations, Jim...

Actually my parents procreated much later in life as well. My dad was 45 when I was born (1955), and my mother was in her late 30s. They were truly the Lawrence Welk generation.

Our generation gap was smack dab in the 60s, so it was definitely more of an overall cultural battle than a purely musical one.